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Dec 16

Recommending to the Next Generation by Charlotte Helgeson

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on December 16, 2022 at 10:29 AM by Genesis Gaule

How many of you read The Happy Hollisters by Andrew E. Svenson under the pseudonym Jerry West? A series about a group of siblings that had fun adventures and solved mysteries. As a kid, I devoured them. So…did I read them to my kids and recommend them to my grandchildren?

Nope.

They were written at a different time, my youth. No one pointed out to the author or publisher that their biases were showing. There are all kinds of explanations I could share as to why that happened and how it was allowed. Important information and valuable to consider especially by a librarian, but isn't at the forefront of a lot of readers’ minds when choosing the next book.

Recommending a book is a gift. If a friend, sibling or teacher highly praises a book, it comes to mind when picking a title to read on the way to Grandmother’s house. Adults like it when Oprah or Reese Witherspoon put together a list, they start at the beginning and read from 1-10. If every 4th and 5th grader wants a Percy Jackson or Diary of a Wimpy Kid book because their friends are reading them, then only a limited number of kids will have their first choice. Others will have to find another title. How do they choose?

This is where personalized recommendations come into play. Library staff are super fantastic at suggesting similar titles. Please ask. We also have Staff Picks marked throughout the library if browsing is your approach. Find out what friends are reading and of course, ask Grandma (or Uncle, Cousin, Neighbor) what she read at your age. Be careful with the age reference unless you’re under 14. Remember you can be the one offering a suggestion. Yes, there are plenty of lists online professionally put together. All good places to start.

elbow-greaseSo do any of my childhood favorites show up in my children’s hands? I’ll be honest. Not many. There are all kinds of new books that I want to read and share, children’s, junior and adult varieties. Have you tried Elbow Grease by John Cena? This is about an electric car. Those didn’t even exist when I was little. The Fog Catcher’s Daughter by Marianne McShane. Monsters in the Briny by Lynn Becker. This one is for the grandchild that might like a little scare.

What about the rest of the family who need recommendations? 

P.S. Swapping books during the holidays is great fun, too!

Dec 06

Book Notes 12/5/2022

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on December 6, 2022 at 9:25 AM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

12/5/2022


Take a break from the hubbub of winter with an evening of fun indoor activities at the Campbell Library! License to Chill: Thursday, December 8 from 4pm-7pm. More information...


Before Austen Comes Aesop by Cheri Blomquist

The Children's Great Books and How to Experience Them // An in-depth examination of the Children's Great Books--the literature that has made the most profound impact on the lives of children throughout Western history. In addition to its invaluable chronological list of titles, from ancient times to the present, the book provides both students and their parents the guidance they need to read leisurely or study formally the Children's Great Books at home.

809.89282 BLOMQUIST


A Death in Door County  by Annelise Ryan

A Wisconsin bookstore owner and cryptozoologist is asked to investigate a series of deaths that just might be proof of a fabled lake monster in this first installment of a new mystery series by USA Today bestselling author Annelise Ryan.

Mystery RYAN Monster v.1


American Midnight  edited by Adam Hochschild

The Great War, a Violent Peace, and Democracy's Forgotten Crisis // A character-driven look at a pivotal period in American history, 1917-1920: the tumultuous home front during WWI and its aftermath, when violence broke out across the country thanks to the first Red Scare, labor strife, and immigration battles.

MH 973.91 HOCHSCHILD


I'm the Girl  by Laurie Cass

When sixteen-year-old Georgia Avis finds the dead body of thirteen-year-old Ashley James outside the gates of an exclusive resort, she teams up with Ashley's older sister Nora to find the killer.

Young Adult SUMMERS


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

Aug 26

Dog Man? AGAIN? by Andrea Lorenz

Posted to Campbell Unclassified on August 26, 2022 at 10:47 AM by Genesis Gaule

Dogman comic pages

It is absolutely and completely fine that your child wants to check out Dog Man: Fetch 22 for the nine millionth time. Lots of kids re-read and for lots of different reasons.

We re-read in order to learn

The human brain is not wired for reading. It’s wired for spoken language. When we learn how to read, we are connecting the spoken sounds of language to written letters. When kids first start to read, much of their effort and attention is focused on decoding – connecting letters to sounds and then mushing those sounds all together to form a word! Beginning readers can accurately decode a text, read the words on the page, but they might not be connecting those words with what the sentence actually says. Re-reading can help your child become a more fluent reader – someone who can decode words and comprehend them at the same time.

In Donalyn Miller’s book The Book Whisperer, she says “My most treasured books have been read many times by me and each time I discover something different. Books are multilayered; one reading is not enough.” We base our understanding of books on our background knowledge – when we have a broader vocabulary, more life experience, certain books—even certain words – will mean something different to us.

We re-read for comfort and enjoyment

The Scholastic Kids & Family Reading Report found that 41% of kids struggle with finding books they like as they get older. They know what to expect with Dog Man. They know the jokes (and probably think they’re funny), the characters are familiar, the plot is just right. Re-reading Dog Man is like eating your favorite meal. You know what you’re getting and you know you like it. 

If your child is re-reading Brawl of the Wild for the fourth or fifth time, they’re still reading! They’ll glean something new from each re-read, be it new vocabulary, fluency, or just confidence in their reading ability.

Beyond Their Favorite Meal

Just as we know we can’t eat our favorite meal every single day and get all the nutrition that we need, re-reading Dog Man will only take us so far on our reading journey. When your child is ready to branch out, here are some options that should appeal to Dog Man fans.

Catwad: It’s Me

by Jim Benton

Catwad is about two cats, one blue grump named Catwad, and one dim-witted orange tabby named Blurmp. Catwad has the same goofy humor and lively illustrations as Dog Man. // Junior Graphic Novel


The First Cat in Space Ate Pizza

by Mac Barnett & Shawn Harris

Oh no! Rats are eating the moon! The only one who can save all of humanity is……a bioengineered cat who will be jettisoned into space accompanied by a toenail clipping robot and the imperious Moon Queen. Animal science experiments who save the day? JUST LIKE DOG MAN! // Junior Graphic Novel


Lunch Lady

by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

What do your lunch ladies do when they’re not doling out your daily helping of mystery meat? This one serves up JUSTICE! An unlikely hero kicking all kinds of bad guy butt should have a special place in the hearts of Dog Man fans. // Junior Graphic Novel


Honorable Mentions: