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Campbell Unclassified

A diverse series of articles by library staff about all things libraries and books!
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Apr 09

Life in Panels by Vanesa Gomez

Posted on April 9, 2021 at 2:41 PM by Genesis Gaule

I remember the day I fell in love with graphic novels. On the walk home from school my older sister had told me all about a type of Japanese book genre called manga, and the cool stories of headband clad ninjas, flexible pirates, and sword wielding soul reapers that she had been reading with her “big kid” friends. As a kindergartener, I thought everything my sister thought was cool was the best thing in the world. When it came to manga, it turned out to be true; although wearing a dress over jeans, not so much.

one punch man reading a graphic novelReading and rereading the first and only volume of Naruto we had until the pages were soft and worn was a ritual after school. Every trip to the library my sister and I would run right over to the small rotating bookshelves that housed the manga section and spend hours reading volume after volume standing up. Once I could navigate the internet, my obsession only grew. In addition to the mountains of traditional prose books I inhaled while at school, the manga I read was like candy that I couldn’t stop myself from getting a stomach ache from.

The diversity of genres that the storytelling medium offered broadened my horizons to ways of life, emotions, struggles I had never encountered in my day to day life. It wasn’t until I grew older that I learned about Western style graphic novels that went beyond the classic Marvel or DC superhero stories. While I will always hold manga near and dear to my heart, I have a newfound appreciation for western graphic novels.

If you are hesitant to jump into the deep end of teenager piloting fighting robots and brightly colored protagonists, here are a few western and eastern graphic novels to dip your toes into.

Maus: A Survivor's Tale

by Art Spiegelman

Our generation will soon become one of the last to hear first hand accounts of those that lived through the Holocaust. This meta story of the author listening to his father’s stories of life during this horrific time, is beautifully illustrated and will break your heart over and over.

The Magic Fish

by Le Nguyen Trung

The art itself is breathtaking, paired with riveting a narrative and take on identity struggles make this one of my all time favorites. Though marked as a junior graphic novel, this is a coming of age story for all ages.

Hey, Kiddo

by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

This autobiography graphic novel is a powerful story that tells the tale of comic book artist Jarrett Krosoczka’s upbringing with family addiction and how he found solace in art.

The Color of Earth

by Tong-Hwa Kim

This series is a Korean graphic novel, also known as a manwha, is about the daughter of a single mother and the budding romances they both experience. It is a look into Korean culture and a unique mother-daughter relationship they share.

The Prince and the Dressmaker

by Jen Wang

This award winning graphic novel is full of beautiful dresses, fleshed out characters, and life lessons for all ages.

Apr 05

Book Notes 4/5/21

Posted on April 5, 2021 at 3:58 PM by Genesis Gaule

Blog Book Notes

4/5/2021


The Campbell Library is open to the public Mondays/Fridays (9am-5pm) and Thursdays (10am-7pm). We also offer Front Door Pick Up and half hour appointments for browsing or computer use Wednesdays (9am-5pm), Tuesdays (9am-7pm), and Thursdays (9am-10am).


Smalltime by Russell Shorto

A Story of My Family and the Mob // Smalltime is a mob story straight out of central casting. It’s a tale of Italian Americans living in squalor and prejudice, and of the rise of Russel, who, like thousands of other young men, created a copy of the American establishment that excluded him. Smalltime draws an intimate portrait of a mobster and his wife, sudden riches, and the toll a lawless life takes on one family.

364.1092 SHORTO

Code Breaker by Walter Isaacson

Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race // Jennifer Doudna wanted to become a scientist. Driven by passion, she and her collaborators invent something that with transform life as we know it. The tool is called CRISPR. Code Breaker is a gripping account of how Nobel Prize winner Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues launched a revolution that will allow us to cure diseases, fend off viruses, and have healthier babies.

576.5 ISAACSON

Keep Sharp by Sanjay Gupta, MD

Build a Better Brain at Any Age // Keep your brain young, healthy, and sharp with this science-driven guide to protecting your mind from decline. Keep Sharp debunks common myths about aging, explores whether there’s a “best” diet or exercise regimen for the brain, and explains whether it’s healthier to play video games that test memory and processing speed, or to engage in social interaction.

612.82 GUPTA

Drawn Across Borders by George Butler

True Stories of Migration //From a celebrated documentary artist, twelve portraits from the front lines of migration form an intimate record of why people leave behind the places they call home. While he worked, his subjects —migrants and refugees from all over the world—shared their stories. Theirs tell of fleeing poverty, disaster, and war, in search of jobs, education, and security.

304.8 BUTLER


If you need help accessing any of these titles or using front door pickup, email or call us and we will be happy to assist you!

View Book Notes PDF archive

Apr 02

Our Next Exploration Goal: The Universe by Cody Rasmussen

Posted on April 2, 2021 at 10:13 AM by Genesis Gaule

milky-way-photographed
Space.  Since ancient times, mankind has looked to the sky and has wondered: what exists beyond our world? Seeing the stars they would believe that above our world was the realm of the gods and other celestial beings. This fascination with space and the unknown has passed through the millennia, resulting in spectacular feats of human ingenuity. Our reach for the stars has led us to create the first airplanes and jets, culminating in the creation of satellites, rockets and other spacecraft. We have landed humans on the Moon and sent rovers to Mars, we are in the process of attempting to plan settlements on the Moon and Mars. Mankind’s thirst for exploration has not abated in the slightest.

The Andromeda Galaxy

Space exploration has inspired authors to write fantastic works of science fiction, creating new worlds and alien races across the universe. Space Operas such as Star Wars and Star Trek have inspired our youth to continue to look at the stars in wonder.  The book series of Dune inspired scientists to name features of Saturn’s largest moon,Titan, after planets. New astronauts and engineers are going into training, hoping to continue to push the limits allowing humanity to explore new worlds.
first-space-shuttle-launched

Humanity has always known that space exploration would either remain a dream to last the ages, or would be our saving grace. We are slowly losing our home planet to ourselves, and over the next few centuries there will come a time when our world will need to make a choice. Whether we should stay on our planet and attempt to save it...or take to the stars and continue one of mankind's greatest desires: exploration.


After all, the Space Opera Star Trek says it best.


“Space: the final frontier.”